Stanford Researchers Develop Record-Breaking Thinner Solar Cells That Absorb More Light

Solar power research is a big deal. Scientists have been searching for a way to improve photovoltaic efficacy for years by developing new technologies – from giant solar concentrator arrays to satellites that beam power back to Earth. Now, Stanford University researchers have developed what they call the thinnest, most efficient photovoltaic wafers ever. Instead of increasing the size of the solar arrays, the researchers created solar wafers with a nano-sized structure that is 1,000 times thinner than any other commercially available thin-film solar cell absorbers.

According to the researchers, the thin film solar wafers are only 1.6 nanometers thin, which cuts down on materials required to produce the cells while making them lighter. At the same time, all of this was done without comprising the solar cells’ ability to absorb visible light. These smaller photovoltaic cells can actually absorb parts of the visible light spectrum with incredible efficiency.

“The coated wafers absorbed 99 percent of the reddish-orange light,” Carl Hagglund, postdoctoral scholar at Department of Chemical Engineering and lead author on the study, said in a statement. “We also achieved 93 percent [light] absorption in the gold nanodots themselves.”

Written by Kevin Lee. To read the full article, click here.

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Could New York run on renewable energy alone?

Three times now, Mark Jacobson has gone out on the same limb. In 2009 he and co-author Mark Delucchi published a cover story in Scientific American that showed how the entire world could get all of its energy — fuel as well as electricity — from wind, water and solar sources by 2030. No coal or oil, no nuclear or natural gas. The tale sounded infeasible — except that Jacobson, from Stanford University, and Delucchi, from the University of California, Davis, calculated just how many hydroelectric dams, wave-energy systems, wind turbines, solar power plants and rooftop photovoltaic installations the world would need to run itself completely on renewable energy.The article sparked a spirited debate on our web site, and it also sparked a larger debate between forward-looking energy planners and those who would rather preserve the status quo. The duo went on to publish a detailed study in the journal Energy Policy that also called out numbers for a U.S. strategy.

Written by MARK FISCHETTI. To read the full article, click here.